Welcome to

Blackwater Draw

in Black and White

To view the slideshow full-sized, click on the image and the black-screen display will open up. Text will be smaller in the full-size slideshow. Each photo will have as much information included as we know about it at this time. The problem with photography is that sometimes we forget that our subjects will be unknown to many of our viewers, or that we will someday forget what we were seeing, thinking, doing when the shutter released. (Remember, this is long before digital!)

 

Archaeological photography is no different. We know better; really, we do... but sometimes, the information simply never gets logged. If you know someone or can help us narrow down dates (even if you just recognize a car!) let us know. The more we know, the more we can share with our visitors.

A note on "authorship": Photography exhibits usually include an artist-- the person who took the photograph. That is a rare bird indeed in archaeology, because generally photos are being taken for documentary purposes. Many archaeologists couldn't even tell you who manned the camera on any given day. When we have this information, we share it, but mostly we try to give you anecdotes and information to help you appreciate the great story of Blackwater Draw.

 

Thank you for visiting- enjoy! 

View to NW of S Pit
View to NW of S Pit

This is one of four images that we have from 1933 that show us a broad overview of the site. This one is captioned "View to NW of S Pit, note triangulation station marked on Fig. 20, Stock and Bode map." We know from the other photos that F. D. Bode was the photographer of these images. Can you spot the "triangulation station"? Hint: Look to the center/center-right of the image. It's small!

N Wall, El Llano Dig 1962-63
N Wall, El Llano Dig 1962-63

Never ever let someone tell you dirt isn't totally awesome. See those gouge marks? They're differentiating the many depositional layers, basically different events in the history of dirt settling down and staying a while. How cool is it that those layers aren't flat? What do you think these undulating stratigraphic contacts say about the environment at that time in prehistory?

Folsom Bison
Folsom Bison

This poor bison was jacketed in 1993. When we "jacket" a bone, it means we've decided to encase it in plaster, either for later research or for travel security. Jacketed bones are plastered in the field, then cut back open in the lab and excavated out. They usually include a bit of sediment as well, to protect the bone.

View to NW of S Pit
View to NW of S Pit

This is one of four images that we have from 1933 that show us a broad overview of the site. This one is captioned "View to NW of S Pit, note triangulation station marked on Fig. 20, Stock and Bode map." We know from the other photos that F. D. Bode was the photographer of these images. Can you spot the "triangulation station"? Hint: Look to the center/center-right of the image. It's small!

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